Published Issues

Bacterial Pattern of Community acquired Urinary Tract Infections: A Challenge for Antimicrobial Resistance

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
 

1Nader A. Nemr, 2Rania M. Kishk*, 3Mohammed Abdou, 4Hassnaa Nassar,
5Noha M Abu bakr Elsaid, 1Mohammed Abou Elmagd
1Endemic and Infectious Diseases Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
2Microbiology and Immunology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
3Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
4Clinical Pathology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
5Department of Public Health, Community, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt

ABSTRACT

Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is considered one of the most common bacterial infections seen in health care. To our knowledge, there is no available antimicrobial resistance surveillance system for monitoring of community-acquired UTIs (CA- UTIs) in our country. Objectives: we aimed to discuss the bacterial pattern and resistance profile of CA-UTIs in Ismailia, Egypt. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 400 patients suffering from symptoms of acute UTIs. Urine specimens were collected by clean-catch mid-stream method, examined microscopically and inoculated immediately on blood agar and MacConkey's agar plates. Colony counting, isolation and identification of the urinary pathogens were performed by the conventional biochemical tests according to the isolated organism. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method. Interpretation was performed according to Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Results: out of 400 specimens, 136 of them revealed no bacterial growth or insignificant bacteriuria. Most of participants with UTI were females (81.8%) (p=0.008) and 54.5% of them were married (P=0.1). Gram negative bacteria were more common than Gram positive representing 66 % and 34% respectively. E. coli was the most common isolated organism (39%) followed by S. aureus (32%), K. Pneumoniae and Pseudomonas (10.5% for each), Proteus (6%) and Enterococci (2%). E. coli isolates showed the highest susceptibility to imipenem, meropenem, amikacin, nitrofurantoin, levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin. Most of our patients were diabetics (64.8%) (p=0.004). The mean ± SD of HbA1c was 6.4±2.0 with 4 to 12.6 range, S.E was 0.1 and 95% C.I was 6.2- 6.7. The highest mean ± SD of HbA1c was in S. aureus infections. Conclusion: Gram negative bacteria were most common than Gram positive with predominance of E. coli with significant relation to the presence of diabetes.

About EJMM

The Egyptian Journal of Medical Microbiology EJMM  ISSN Print 1110-2179 - ISSN Online: 1110-2179, The official publication of Egyptian Society of Medical Microbiology

© www.ejmm-eg.com. All Rights Reserved. Designed By www.iso-soft.net

Search